• Sarah E. Brown

The Importance of a Supportive Female Peer Group


Several of the articles I have posted this week emphasize the importance of women in the workplace having strong female peer support groups. This particular article cites a study by Capital One on why women stay or leave tech careers.

“More than half of women in tech leave the industry by their career’s midpoint, per Capital One. The survey sought opinions from 250 women who have been in tech jobs at least eight years and have reached senior levels, and 200 women who left the industry after three or more years. “

“Major differences among women who stayed versus women who left the field:

75 percent of women who stayed had female role models within their companies, compared to 44 percent of women who left. Women who stayed are twice as likely to value female peer groups as women who left (45 percent compared to 23 percent). Among women who succeeded, 56 percent said they had superior training, compared to 34 percent of women who left tech.”

An article I shared earlier makes the same point:

10 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT WOMENS NETWORKS.

https://www.wbjournal.com/article/10-things-i-know-about-womens-networks

While there is research on the value of female support, there is also evidence that females need mentoring and support from more senior positions as well. But, there are frankly too few senior female executives to mentor and coach all the mid- and entry-level female professionals who need it. This is why I am working to teach women how they can get the coaching and mentoring they need from their female peers. Armed with a few simple tools, they can turn that valuable support group into the coaching and mentoring capability they also need.

I encourage you to read the whole article about why women leave the tech field here:

WHAT'S CAUSING WOMEN TO STAY OR LEAVE TECH FIELD

https://www.bizjournals.com/bizwomen/news/latest-news/2019/10/whats-causing-women-to-stay-or-leave-tech-field.html?page=all

Privacy Policy  I  Terms & Conditions

Sarah E. Brown 2019